Despite Microsoft Patch, US Gov’t Warns of ‘Active Threat Still Developing’ From Open Back Doors

Reuters reports: The White House on Sunday urged computer network operators to take further steps to gauge whether their systems were targeted amid a hack of Microsoft Corp’s Outlook email program, saying a recent software patch still left serious vulnerabilities. “This is an active threat still developing and we urge network operators to take it very seriously,” a White House official said, adding that top U.S. security officials were working to decide what next steps to take following the breach…

America’s Air Force Is Having To Reverse Engineer Parts of Its Own Stealth Bomber

Long-time Slashdot reader AmiMoJo shares a report from The Drive: In a surprising turn of events, the United States government is calling upon its country’s industry to reverse engineer components for the Air Force’s B-2 Spirit stealth bomber. An official call for this highly unusual kind of assistance was put out today on the U.S. government’s contracting website beta.SAM.gov. Mark Thompson, a national-security analyst at the Project On Government Oversight, brought our attention to the notice, which seeks an engineering effort that will reverse engineer key parts for the B-2’s Load Heat Exchangers. While it is not exactly clear what part of the aircraft’s many complex and exotic subsystems these heat exchangers relate to, the bomber has no shortage of avionics systems, for example, which could require cooling…

While it’s hard to say exactly why this approach is being taken now, it indicates that the original plans for these components are unavailable or the manufacturing processes and tooling used to produce them no longer exists… Indeed, as the average age of the Air Force fleet continues to increase, there are only likely to be more such requirements for parts that are long out of production. Before he stood down, the former Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics, Will Roper, told Air Force Magazine of his desire for a “digital representation of every part in the Air Force inventory….”

Upcoming Webinar: The Future of Cyber: Maturing your Cyber Program over the Life of your Business

What you will learn in this webinar:

  • Why your cyber program should be informed by threat.
  • How to choose which areas of your business to protect first.
  • How to make smart security investments that are aligned with business priorities and generate optimal results from your cyber program.
  • Why security teams will need to pivot their strategy over the life of their business to ensure a successful cyber program and how you can apply these strategies.
  • Why generating reports is ineffective and how to effectively measure your cyber program.
  • How to increase your risk and security intelligence to make more confident decisions and provide trustworthy information to the board and executives. 

Hear from our subject matter experts:
Bill Vollono, Sales Engineer, Recorded Future
Kirk Hogan, CIO, Practice Lead, Security Operations, Iceberg Networks

Securing APIs: Application Architecture Disrupted

Posted under: Research and Analysis

When you think of disruption, the typical image is a tornado coming through and ripping things up, leaving towns leveled and nothing the same moving forward. But disruption can be slow and steady, incremental in the way everything you thought you knew has changed. Securing cloud environments was like that, initially trying to use existing security concepts and controls, which worked well enough. Until they didn’t and forced a re-evaluation of everything that we thought we knew about security. The changes were (and still are for many) challenging, but overall very positive.

At Least 30,000 US Organizations Newly Hacked Via Holes In Microsoft’s Email Software

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Krebs On Security: At least 30,000 organizations across the United States — including a significant number of small businesses, towns, cities and local governments — have over the past few days been hacked by an unusually aggressive Chinese cyber espionage unit that’s focused on stealing email from victim organizations, multiple sources tell KrebsOnSecurity. The espionage group is exploiting four newly-discovered flaws in Microsoft Exchange Server email software, and has seeded hundreds of thousands of victim organizations worldwide with tools that give the attackers total, remote control over affected systems.

In each incident, the intruders have left behind a “web shell,” an easy-to-use, password-protected hacking tool that can be accessed over the Internet from any browser that gives the attackers administrative access to the victim’s computer servers. Speaking on condition of anonymity, two cybersecurity experts who’ve briefed U.S. national security advisors on the attack told KrebsOnSecurity the Chinese hacking group thought to be responsible has seized control over “hundreds of thousands” of Microsoft Exchange Servers worldwide — with each victim system representing approximately one organization that uses Exchange to process email. Microsoft said the Exchange flaws are being targeted by a previously unidentified Chinese hacking crew it dubbed “Hafnium,” and said the group had been conducting targeted attacks on email systems used by a range of industry sectors, including infectious disease researchers, law firms, higher education institutions, defense contractors, policy think tanks, and NGOs.

At Least 30,000 U.S. Organizations Newly Hacked Via Holes in Microsoft’s Email Software

At least 30,000 organizations across the United States — including a significant number of small businesses, towns, cities and local governments — have over the past few days been hacked by an unusually aggressive Chinese cyber espionage unit that’s focused on stealing email from victim organizations, multiple sources tell KrebsOnSecurity. The espionage group is exploiting four newly-discovered flaws in Microsoft Exchange Server email software, and has seeded hundreds of thousands of victim organizations worldwide with tools that give the attackers total, remote control over affected systems.