Will the ‘Information Paradox’ Pioneered by Stephen Hawking Ever Be Resolved?

Science enthusiasts around the world are mourning the loss of Stephen Hawking, the renowned physicist and beloved public figure, who passed away on Wednesday at the age of 76. Hawking spent his life exploring the universe’s deepest mysteries and advancing sophisticated frameworks to explain its most elusive phenomena, such as black holes, alternate universes, and the tenuous future of life on Earth and elsewhere.

Chinese Hackers Hit US Firms Linked To South China Sea Dispute

Chinese hackers have launched a wave of attacks on mainly U.S. engineering and defense companies linked to the disputed South China Sea, the cybersecurity firm FireEye Inc. said. From a report: The suspected Chinese cyber-espionage group dubbed TEMP.Periscope appeared to be seeking information that would benefit the Chinese government, said FireEye, a U.S.-based provider network protection systems. The hackers have focused on U.S. maritime entities that were either linked to — or have clients operating in — the South China Sea, said Fred Plan, senior analyst at FireEye in Los Angeles.

“They are going after data that can be used strategically, so it is line with state espionage,” said Plan, whose firm has tracked the group since 2013. “A private entity probably wouldn’t benefit from the sort of data that is being stolen.” The TEMP.Periscope hackers were seeking information in areas like radar range or how precisely a system in development could detect activity at sea, Plan said. The surge in attacks picked up pace last month and was ongoing.

What to do if your cloud provider stops offering its services

What would your organization do if your cloud provider were to go out of business? What happens if your cloud provider suddenly stops offering critical services that your organization requires for its business to function properly? Businesses need to start asking these important questions and develop plans to address these scenarios.

Google Lens arrives on iOS

On the heels of last week’s rollout on Android, Google’s new AI-powered technology, Google Lens, is now arriving on iOS. The feature is available within the Google Photos iOS application, where it can do things like identify objects, buildings, and landmarks, and tell you more information about them, including helpful details like their phone number, address, or open hours. It can also identify things like books, paintings in museums, plants, and animals. In the case of some objects, it can also take actions.

Cloud security startup Zscaler opens at $27.50, a pop of 72% on Nasdaq, raising $192M in its IPO

The first big tech IPO of the year has opened with a bang. Zscaler, a security startup that confidentially filed for an IPO last year, started trading this morning as ZS on Nasdaq at a price of $27.50/share. This was a pop of 71.9  percent on its opening price of $16, and speaks to a bullish moment for security startups and potentially public listings for tech companies in general.

Your smart camera is not immune to intrusion

It is a sad fact, but smart devices are not nearly as safe as they are popular. In one of our recent blog posts, we wrote about the threats this insecurity generates for users of connected household devices. Our post today sheds light on yet another discovery made by our pros: a smart camera with nearly as many vulnerabilities as there are features described in its user manual.

US Utilities Have Finally Realized Electric Cars May Save Them

Pity the utility company. For decades, electricity demand just went up and up, as surely as the sun rose in the east. Power companies could plan ahead with confidence. No longer. From a report: This year, the Tennessee Valley Authority scrapped its 20-year projections through 2035, since it was clear they had drastically underestimated the extent to which renewable energy would depress demand for electricity from the grid. But there is a bright spot for utilities: electric vehicles (EV), which make up 1% of the US car market.

For years, that market barely registered on utilities’ radar. As EVs find growing success, utilities are building charging infrastructure and arranging generous rebates. Pacific Gas and Electric, Southern California Edison, San Diego Gas & Electric, and New Jersey’s PSE&G have partnered with carmakers to offer thousands of dollars in rebates for BMW, Nissan, and other brands. Now utilities are asking Congress for help as they attempt to keep tapping into EV demand. A collection of 36 of the nation’s largest utilities wrote a letter (PDF) to congressional leadership on March 13, asking for a lift on the cap on EV tax credits. The signatories’ include California’s Pacific Gas & Electric, New York’s Consolidated Edison, the southeast’s Duke Energy Company, and others covering almost every state. At the moment, Americans who buy electric vehicles receive a $7,500 federal tax credit (along with some state incentives) for each vehicle.

Attackers turn to IoT and ICS to find gaps in security

Research from Cisco and partners reveal increased interest in IoT and ICS from security professionals and attackers alike

Technology solutions and processes that rely on the Internet of Things (IoT) are rapidly becoming standard equipment in many organizations as well as industrial facilities, thanks to IoT systems’ ability to automate and communicate with devices. Unfortunately, as we detail in the Cisco 2018 Annual Cybersecurity Report, attackers see benefits to IoT as well—namely, the ability to take control of IoT devices with weak or no security and build powerful IoT botnets. They also see value in taking control of operational technology (OT) systems, which are often used to manage critical infrastructure.