Why Protection Is Paramount In The age Of The Internet Of Things

The Internet of Things is offers a wealth of opportunity for the telecoms industry. It presents mobile operators a chance to develop and enhance their consumer offerings and increase market growth.  Research suggests the industry will grow from $900 billion in 2014 to $4.3 trillion by 2024[i]. We’ve already seen the likes of Vodafone delve into the consumer side of IoT with the launch of its new “V by Vodafone” bundle, whereby consumers are charged for the number of connected devices they add to their monthly plan. However, alongside this raft of growth and opportunity comes the heightened risk of security breaches.

Can Zuckerberg’s media blitz take the pressure off Facebook?

NEW YORK (AP) — In the wake of a privacy scandal involving a Trump-connected data-mining firm, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg embarked on a rare media mini-blitz in an attempt to take some of the public and political pressure off the social network.But it’s far from clear whether he’s won over U.S. and European authorities, much less the broader public whose status updates provide Facebook with an endless stream of data it uses to sell targeted ads.On Wednesday, the generally reclusive Zuckerberg sat for an interview on CNN and gave another to the publication Wired, addressing reports that Cambridge Analytica purloined the data of more than 50 million Facebook users in order to sway elections. The Trump campaign paid the firm $6 million during the 2016 election, although it has since distanced itself from Cambridge.Zuckerberg apologized for a “major breach of trust,” admitted mistakes and outlined steps to protect users following Cambridge’s data grab.“I am really sorry that happened,” Zuckerberg said on CNN. Facebook has a “responsibility” to protect its users’ data, he added, noting that if it fails, “we don’t deserve to have the opportunity to serve people.”His mea culpa on cable television came a few hours after he acknowledged his company’s mistakes in a Facebook post , but without saying he was sorry.Zuckerberg and Facebook’s No. 2 executive, Sheryl Sandberg, had been quiet since news broke Friday that Cambridge may have used data improperly obtained from roughly 50 million Facebook users to try to sway elections. Cambridge’s clients included Donald Trump’s general-election campaign.Facebook shares have dropped some 8 percent, lopping about $46 billion off the company’s market value, since the revelations were first published.While several experts said Zuckerberg took an important step with the CNN interview, few were convinced that he put the Cambridge issue behind hm. Zuckerberg’s apology, for instance, seemed rushed and pro forma to Helio Fred Garcia, a crisis-management professor at NYU and Columbia University.“He didn’t acknowledge the harm or potential harm to the affected users,” Garcia said. “I doubt most people realized he was apologizing.”Instead, the Facebook chief pointed to steps the company has already taken, such as a 2014 move to restrict the access outside apps had to user data. (That move came too late to stop Cambridge.) And he laid out a series of technical changes that will further limit the data such apps can collect, pledged to notify users when outsiders misuse their information and said Facebook will “audit” apps that exhibit troubling behavior.That audit will be a giant undertaking, said David Carroll, a media researcher at the Parsons School of Design in New York – one that he said will likely turn up a vast number of apps that did “troubling, distressing things.”But on other fronts, Zuckerberg carefully hedged otherwise striking remarks.In the CNN interview, for instance, he said he would be “happy” to testify before Congress – but only if it was “the right thing to do.” Zuckerberg went on to note that many other Facebook officials might be more appropriate witnesses depending on what Congress wanted to know.At another point, the Facebook chief seemed to favor regulation for Facebook and other internet giants. At least, that is, the “right” kind of rules, such as ones requiring online political ads to disclose who paid for them. In almost the next breath, however, Zuckerberg steered clear of endorsing a bill that would write such rules into federal law, and instead talked up Facebook’s own voluntary efforts on that front.“They’ll fight tooth and nail to fight being regulated,” said Timothy Carone, a Notre Dame business professor. “In six months we’ll be having the same conversations, and it’s just going to get worse going into the election.”Even Facebook’s plan to let users know about data leaks may put the onus on users to educate themselves. Zuckerberg said Facebook will “build a tool” that lets users see if their information had been impacted by the Cambridge leak, suggesting that the company won’t be notifying people automatically. Facebook took this kind of do-it-yourself approach in the case of Russian election meddling, in contrast to Twitter, which notified users who had been exposed to Russian propaganda on its network.In what has become one of the worst backlashes Facebook has ever seen, politicians in the U.S. and Britain have called for Zuckerberg to explain its data practices in detail. State attorneys general in Massachusetts, New York and New Jersey have opened investigations into the Cambridge mess. And some have rallied to a movement that urges people to delete their Facebook accounts entirely.Sandy Parakilas, who worked in data protection for Facebook in 2011 and 2012, told a U.K. parliamentary committee Wednesday that the company was vigilant about its network security but lax when it came to protecting users’ data.He said personal data including email addresses and in some cases private messages was allowed to leave Facebook servers with no real controls on how the data was used after that.Paul Argenti, a business professor at Dartmouth, said that while Zuckerberg’s comments hit the right notes, they still probably aren’t enough. “The question is, can you really trust Facebook,” he said. “I don’t think that question has been answered.”Danica Kirka and Gregory Katz reported from London. AP Technology Writer Mae Anderson in New York contributed to this story.

4 Trends Driving Security Operations Centers

Today, the need for organizational trust has been amplified by cyber threats that continue to grow in variety, volume and scope. According to the Cisco 2018 Annual Cybersecurity Report, 32 percent of breaches affected more than half of organizations’ systems, up from 15 percent in 2016. Network breaches shake customer confidence, and it’s essential that organizations protect intellectual property, customer records and other critical digital assets. A strong cybersecurity strategy is today’s foundation for creating confidence among partners and customers.

Walmart.com: Organizher 15″ x 12″ Write ‘N Wipe Monthly Calendar with Free Store Pick-up – $2.91

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The Mead Organizher name is the most recognizable brand in family planning and organization supplies . The brand is an industry leader in trend analysis and combines a legacy of consistency with both basic and fashion-forward planners and more. This calendar offers customization and open space to write down family schedules and events, as well as plans for meals each day.

Royal decree: LeBron scores 35, carries Cavs past Raptors

CLEVELAND (AP) — The standings show the Eastern Conference’s top team plays in Canada.The best player remains in Cleveland, Ohio.LeBron James reminded Toronto he’s king.Playing without five teammates and his coach, James scored 35 points and added 17 assists, his last setting up a late a 3-pointer by Kevin Love, as the undermanned Cavaliers rallied to beat the Raptors 132-129 on Wednesday night.The Cavs were down five rotational players and coach Tyronn Lue, who missed his second straight game for health reasons.But they still had James, who earlier in the day said, “I’ll be available, so we got a chance.”The three-time champion delivered another virtuoso performance, adding seven rebounds without committing a turnover in nearly 40 minutes.“I’ve never seen anything like it,” said associate coach Larry Drew, filling in for Lue. “It’s just amazing what he does, night in and night out. How he sustains it is just mind-boggling.”James made three free throws in the final 7.8 seconds, but missed one with 3.9 seconds to go, giving Toronto a final shot. DeMar DeRozan got a decent look on a 3-pointer – contested by James – at the horn but missed. DeRozan and Toronto coaches complained the All-Star was fouled to no avail.The win felt like a statement by the Cavs, but James insisted there were no intended messages.“It’s a good win for us because of how depleted we are on our roster and everything that’s been going on,” he said. “It’s a good win for us against a very good opponent.“But I don’t need to remind anybody about what my teams are capable of doing.”Love, playing his second game after missing 21 games with a broken left hand, finished with 23 points and 12 rebounds and George Hill had 22 on 10-of-11 shooting for the Cavs, who were blown out by 34 points against Toronto in January.But that was before Cleveland shook up its roster with four trades designed to get back to the NBA Finals. The Cavs are third in the East, but still as dangerous as anyone.“They’re still a top team in our conference – and in this league,” DeRozan said. “You can’t overlook them or under-look them no matter what type of changes they made.”Kyle Lowry scored 24 and DeRozan had 21 for the Raptors, who scored 79 points in the first half and were in control in the third quarter before James brought Cleveland back.With the Cavs up 125-124, James drove the lane and whipped the ball into the corner to Love, who knocked down his 1,000th career 3-pointer.The Raptors have lost to the Cavs in each of the past two postseasons, getting swept last year in the conference finals. But this is a different Toronto team, deeper, more experienced and maybe poised to dethrone Cleveland.Not if James has anything to say about it.LAST SHOTWhile he protested on the floor, DeRozan was calm in addressing whether James made contact with him on his errant 3-pointer.“I don’t know,” he said. “It’s over with now. There’s nothing you can do about it. It was a heck of a game.”REMATCHThe teams will meet again on April 3 in Cleveland.CURIOUS GEORGEHill had his best game since joining the Cavs. He had shot just 12 of 31 in his previous five games.“I’ve been playing like crap the last couple weeks,” Hill said. “I’ve been hard on myself, staying in the gym with our coaches and things like that, shooting more, watching more film and just trying to figure out how I can find myself again.”TIP-INSRaptors: Tied a franchise record by scoring 79 points in the first half. They also did it in 1997 against the Nets. … Coach Dwane Casey said the team’s confidence has never been higher and has given Toronto an aura it didn’t have before. “It doesn’t mean you’re going to go out and beat a team,” he said. “But I think we go into the game with a different mindset, more of a hunted mindset than we did last year.” … G C.J. Miles sat out with a flu bug. … The Raptors have made at least 10 3-pointers in team-record 14 straight games.Cavaliers: F Kyle Korver was excused Tuesday following the death of his younger brother, Kirk. … F/C Tristan Thompson (ankle) and Rodney Hood (back) were listed as questionable but sat out. … F Larry Nance Jr. (hamstring) is aiming to return this weekend. He has missed four games. … Drew spoke with Lue on Tuesday and said he reported feeling better. “He’s on the right trail of recovering and I’m really happy to hear that from him,” Drew said. … Nick Gilbert, owner Dan Gilbert’s son, sat in the front row next to his dad. The younger Gilbert recently spent 38 days in the hospital following brain surgery. He received an ovation from the crowd.UP NEXTRaptors: Host Brooklyn on Friday.Cavaliers: Host Phoenix on Friday.More NBA basketball: https://apnews.com/tag/NBAbasketball

A Q&A with Mark Zuckerberg About Data Privacy

Zuckerberg: The first thing is, I really wanted to make sure we had a full and accurate understanding of everything that happened. I know that there was a lot of pressure to speak sooner, but my assessment was that it was more important that what we said was fully accurate.

Facebook’s Zuckerberg apologizes for ‘major breach of trust’

NEW YORK (AP) — Breaking five days of silence, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg apologized for a “major breach of trust,” admitted mistakes and outlined steps to protect user data in light of a privacy scandal involving a Trump-connected data-mining firm.“I am really sorry that happened,” Zuckerberg said of the scandal involving data mining firm Cambridge Analytica. Facebook has a “responsibility” to protect its users’ data, he said in a Wednesday interview on CNN. If it fails, he said, “we don’t deserve to have the opportunity serve people.”His mea culpa on cable television came a few hours after he acknowledged his company’s mistakes in a Facebook post , but without saying he was sorry.Zuckerberg and Facebook’s No. 2 executive, Sheryl Sandberg, had been quiet since news broke Friday that Cambridge may have used data improperly obtained from roughly 50 million Facebook users to try to sway elections. Cambridge’s clients included Donald Trump’s general-election campaign.Facebook shares have dropped some 8 percent, lopping about $46 billion off the company’s market value, since the revelations were first published.In the CNN interview, Zuckerberg offered equivocal and carefully hedged answers to two other questions. He said, for instance, that he would be “happy” to testify before Congress, but only if it was “the right thing to do.” He went on to note that many other Facebook officials might be more appropriate witnesses depending on what Congress wanted to know.Similarly, the Facebook chief seemed at one point to favor regulation for Facebook and other internet giants – at least the “right” kind of rules, he said, such as ones that require online political ads to disclose who paid for them. In almost the next breath, however, Zuckerberg steered clear of endorsing a bill that would write such rules into federal law, and instead talked up Facebook’s own voluntary efforts on that front.Even before the scandal broke, Facebook has already taken the most important steps to prevent a recurrence, Zuckerberg said. For example, in 2014, it reduced access outside apps had to user data. However, some of the measures didn’t take effect until a year later, allowing Cambridge to access the data in the intervening months.Zuckerberg acknowledged that there is more to do.In his Facebook post, Zuckerberg said it will ban developers who don’t agree to an audit. An app’s developer will no longer have access to data from people who haven’t used that app in three months. Data will also be generally limited to user names, profile photos and email, unless the developer signs a contract with Facebook and gets user approval.In a separate post, Facebook said it will inform people whose data was misused by apps. Facebook first learned of this breach of privacy more than two years ago, but hadn’t mentioned it publicly until Friday.The company said it was “building a way” for people to know if their data was accessed by “This Is Your Digital Life,” the psychological-profiling quiz app that researcher Aleksandr Kogan created and paid about 270,000 people to take part in. Cambridge Analytica later obtained information from the app for about 50 million Facebook users, as the app also vacuumed up data on people’s friends – including those who never downloaded the app or gave explicit consent.Chris Wylie, a Cambridge co-founder who left in 2014, has said one of the firm’s goals was to influence people’s perceptions by injecting content, some misleading or false, all around them. It’s not clear whether Facebook would be able to tell users whether they had seen such content.Cambridge has shifted the blame to Kogan, which the firm described as a contractor. Kogan described himself as a scapegoat.Kogan, a psychology researcher at Cambridge University, told the BBC that both Facebook and Cambridge Analytica have tried to place the blame on him, even though the firm ensured him that everything he did was legal.“One of the great mistakes I did here was I just didn’t ask enough questions,” he said. “I had never done a commercial project. I didn’t really have any reason to doubt their sincerity. That’s certainly something I strongly regret now.”He said the firm paid some $800,000 for the work, but it went to participants in the survey.“My motivation was to get a dataset I could do research on,” he said. “I have never profited from this in any way personally.”Authorities in Britain and the United States are investigating.David Carroll, a professor at Parsons School of Design in New York who sued Cambridge Analytica in the U.K., said he was not satisfied with Zuckerberg’s response, but acknowledged that “this is just the beginning.”He said it was “insane” that Facebook had yet to take legal action against Cambridge parent SCL Group over the inappropriate data use. Carroll himself sued Cambridge Friday to recover data on him that the firm had obtained.Sandy Parakilas, who worked in data protection for Facebook in 2011 and 2012, told a U.K. parliamentary committee Wednesday that the company was vigilant about its network security but lax when it came to protecting users’ data.He said personal data including email addresses and in some cases private messages was allowed to leave Facebook servers with no real controls on how the data was used after that.“The real challenge here is that Facebook was allowing developers to access the data of people who hadn’t explicitly authorized that,” he said, adding that the company had “lost sight” of what developers did with the data.Danica Kirka and Gregory Katz reported from London. AP Technology Writer Mae Anderson in New York contributed to this story.