Time For DDoS Attacks

Every minute that a Denial-of-Service attack takes down websites and services, money and reputation drains from the bottom line. Sean Newman, Director of Product Management at Corero Network Security commented below.

Four short links: 16 March 2018

Longevity FAQ (Laura Deming) — I run Longevity Fund. I spend a lot of time thinking about what could increase healthy human lifespan. This is my overview of the field for beginners. Intimate Partner Violence — What we’ve discovered in our research is that digital abuse of intimate partners is both more mundane and more complicated than we might think. […] [I]ntimate partner violence upends the way we typically think about how to protect digital privacy and security. You should read this because we all need to get a lot more aware of the ways in which the tools we make might be used to hurt others.

The Secret Sharer

Four Alleged Associates of Sinaloa Cartel-Linked Encrypted Phone Company Are On the Run

Last week, Motherboard reported that the FBI had arrested the CEO of Phantom Secure, a company allegedly providing custom, security-focused BlackBerry phones to the Sinaloa drug cartel, among other criminal groups. But the feds aren’t only going after Phantom’s owner: on Thursday, the Department of Justice announced an indictment against other apparent Phantom staff too, and confirmed what one source told Motherboard before it became public knowledge—that authorities have seized Phantom’s domains used for routing messages.

Li Ka-Shing to step down as chairman of CK Hutchison, owner of 3 and other tech holdings

A significant changing of the guard is underway in the world of telecoms and tech out of Asia. CK Hutchison, a Hong Kong conglomerate that owns the European mobile carrier 3 among other mobile and tech holdings, has announced that Li Ka-Shing is stepping down as the company’s chairman and executive director, after 46 years at the helm and 68 years since founding Cheung Kong (CK), effective May 10. He will be succeeded by Li Tzar Kuoi, known as Victor Li, his son and the brother of businessman Richard Li.

No, Space Did Not Permanently Alter 7 Percent of Scott Kelly’s DNA

Several stories this week have proclaimed that the DNA of former NASA astronaut Scott Kelly changed during his year living on the International Space Station. The stories say that 7 percent of his genes did not return back to normal when he came back to Earth. It makes it seem as if the space environment permanently altered his genetic code. The problem? That’s not true. From a report: The mistake stems from an inaccurate interpretation of NASA’s ongoing Twins Study. When Scott went to space in 2015, his identical twin Mark — also a former NASA astronaut — stayed on the ground. The idea was that Mark would serve as a control subject — a nearly identical genetic copy that NASA could use to figure out how the space environment changed Scott’s body. Some fascinating results have come out of the experiment. For one thing, Scott’s gut bacteria changed significantly while he was in space. And yes, he did experience genetic changes. The protective caps on the ends of his DNA strands — known as telomeres — increased while in space. But space didn’t permenantly alter 7 percent of his DNA. […] NASA also confirmed this in a statement to The Verge: “Scott’s DNA did not fundamentally change,” a NASA spokesperson said. “What researchers did observe are changes in gene expression, which is how your body reacts to your environment. This likely is within the range for humans under stress, such as mountain climbing or SCUBA diving.”