Over 40 services require TLS 1.2 minimum for AWS FIPS endpoints

In a March 2020 blog post, we told you about work Amazon Web Services (AWS) was undertaking to update all of our AWS Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) endpoints to a minimum of Transport Layer Security (TLS) 1.2 across all AWS Regions. Today, we’re happy to announce that over 40 services have been updated and now require TLS 1.2:

These services no longer support using TLS 1.0 or TLS 1.1 on their FIPS endpoints. To help you meet your compliance needs, we are updating all AWS FIPS endpoints to a minimum of TLS 1.2 across all Regions. We will continue to update our services to support only TLS 1.2 or later on AWS FIPS endpoints, which you can check on the AWS FIPS webpage. This change doesn’t affect non-FIPS AWS endpoints.

When you make a connection from your client application to an AWS service endpoint, the client provides its TLS minimum and TLS maximum versions. The AWS service endpoint will always select the maximum version offered.

What is TLS?

TLS is a cryptographic protocol designed to provide secure communication across a computer network. API calls to AWS services are secured using TLS.

What is FIPS 140-2?

The FIPS 140-2 is a US and Canadian government standard that specifies the security requirements for cryptographic modules that protect sensitive information.

What are AWS FIPS endpoints?

All AWS services offer TLS 1.2 encrypted endpoints that can be used for all API calls. Some AWS services also offer FIPS 140-2 endpoints for customers who need to use FIPS validated cryptographic libraries to connect to AWS services.

Why are we upgrading to TLS 1.2?

Our upgrade to TLS 1.2 across all Regions reflects our ongoing commitment to help customers meet their compliance needs.

Is there more assistance available to help verify or update client applications?

If you’re using an AWS software development kit (AWS SDK), you can find information about how to properly configure the minimum and maximum TLS versions for your clients in the following AWS SDK topics:

You can also visit Tools to Build on AWS and browse by programming language to find the relevant SDK. AWS Support tiers cover development and production issues for AWS products and services, along with other key stack components. AWS Support doesn’t include code development for client applications.

If you have any questions or issues, you can start a new thread on one of the AWS forums, or contact AWS Support or your technical account manager (TAM).

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Author

Janelle Hopper

Janelle Hopper is a Senior Technical Program Manager in AWS Security with over 15 years of experience in the IT security field. She works with AWS services, infrastructure, and administrative teams to identify and drive innovative solutions that improve AWS’ security posture.

Author

Marta Taggart

Marta is a Seattle-native and Senior Program Manager in AWS Security, where she focuses on privacy, content development, and educational programs. Her interest in education stems from two years she spent in the education sector while serving in the Peace Corps in Romania. In her free time, she’s on a global hunt for the perfect cup of coffee.