Cyber Security Roundup for November 2020

A roundup of UK focused Cyber and Information Security News, Blog Posts, Reports and general Threat Intelligence from the previous calendar month, October 2020.

London’s Hackney Borough Council has been tight-lipped about “a serious cyber-attack” which took down its IT systems, impacting its service delivery to citizens. Providing scant information about the attack, but it does have all the hallmarks of a ransomware outbreak. The council says it is working with the UK’s National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) and the Ministry of Housing to investigate and understand the impact of the incident. Ransomware attacks continue to be a major blight for UK public services, with councils to hospitals struggling to defend their IT systems against ransomware. Earlier this year Redcar and Cleveland Borough Council said it had been hit by a ransomware attack, which cost it more than £10m.

It looks like the ransomware will continue to pose a major threat to the UK for some time to come, with separate reports advising a resurgence in the Emotet trojan, a common dropper of ransomware, while the hacking group behind the notorious Ryuk ransomware has been reported as being active again. A new variant of the Ryuk ransomware was behind a cyberattack on Sopra Steria’s operations in October 2020, the digital services company confirmed.

 BA lost 430,000 payment card details to hackers after Magecart e-commence skimming attack in 2018
This data breach was a lesson in failing at PCI DSS compliance, with customer credit card details stolen due to ‘Magecart’ payment card skimming script being injected onto the BA payment page. The attackers initially compromised the BA network through a third-party worker’s remote access (not MFA protected), gaining access to BA’s Citrix environment. Once inside the BA network, the attackers were gifted privilege level access after finding a domain admin account username and password in plaintext on a server folder. I understand investigators found the storage of payment cards in plaintext, including CVV numbers post-payment authorisation which is never permitted under PCI DSS rules. Aside from the ICO fine and reputational damage, this breach cost is likely to have cost BA a small fortune in specialised PCI PFI digital investigation forensic work, a complete solution rebuild, and with card brand penalties. The Visa Chief Enterprise Risk Officer once said ‘no compromised entity has yet been found to be in compliance with PCI DSS at the time of a breach’, I understand that statement still rings true today.
Stay safe and secure.

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*** This is a Security Bloggers Network syndicated blog from IT Security Expert Blog authored by SecurityExpert. Read the original post at: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/securityexpert/~3/qNiBfvCB-mY/cyber-security-roundup-for-november-2020.html