New! Streamline existing IAM Access Analyzer findings using archive rules

AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) Access Analyzer generates comprehensive findings to help you identify resources that grant public and cross-account access. Now, you can also apply archive rules to existing findings, so you can better manage findings and focus on the findings that need your attention most.

You can think of archive rules as similar to email rules. You define email rules to automatically organize emails. With IAM Access Analyzer, you can define archive rules to automatically mark findings as intended access. Now, those rules can apply to existing as well as new IAM Access Analyzer findings. This helps you focus on findings for potential unintended access to your resources. You can then easily track and resolve these findings by reducing access, helping you to work towards least privilege.

In this post, first I give a brief overview of IAM Access Analyzer. Then I show you an example of how to create an archive rule to automatically archive findings for intended access. Finally, I show you how to update an archive rule to mark existing active findings as intended.

IAM Access Analyzer overview

IAM Access Analyzer helps you determine which resources can be accessed publicly or from other accounts or organizations. IAM Access Analyzer determines this by mathematically analyzing access control policies attached to resources. This form of analysis—called automated reasoning—applies logic and mathematical inference to determine all possible access paths allowed by a resource policy. This is how IAM Access Analyzer uses provable security to deliver comprehensive findings for potential unintended bucket access. You can enable IAM Access Analyzer in the IAM console by creating an analyzer for an account or an organization. Once you’ve created your analyzer, you can review findings for resources that can be accessed publicly or from other AWS accounts or organizations.

Create an archive rule to automatically archive findings for intended access

When you review findings and discover common patterns for intended access, you can create archive rules to automatically archive those findings. This helps you focus on findings for unintended access to your resources, just like email rules help streamline your inbox.

To create an archive rule

In the IAM console, choose Archive rules under Access Analyzer. Then, choose Create archive rule to display the Create archive rule page shown in Figure 1. There, you find the option to name the rule or use the name generated by default. In the Rule section, you define criteria to match properties of findings you want to archive. Just like email rules, you can add multiple criteria to the archive rule. You can define each criterion by selecting a finding property, an operator, and a value. To help ensure a rule doesn’t archive findings for public access, the criterion Public access is false is suggested by default.
 

Figure 1: IAM Access Analyzer create archive rule page where you add criteria to create a new archive rule

Figure 1: IAM Access Analyzer create archive rule page where you add criteria to create a new archive rule

For example, I have a security audit role external to my account that I expect to have access to resources in my account. To mark that access as intended, I create a rule to archive all findings for Amazon S3 buckets in my account that can be accessed by the security audit role outside of the account. To do this, I include two criteria: Resource type matches S3 bucket, and the AWS Account value matches the security audit role ARN. Once I add these criteria, the Results section displays the list of existing active findings the archive rule matches, as shown in Figure 2.
 

Figure 2: A rule to archive all findings for S3 buckets in an account that can be accessed by the audit role outside of the account, with matching findings displayed

Figure 2: A rule to archive all findings for S3 buckets in an account that can be accessed by the audit role outside of the account, with matching findings displayed

When you’re done adding criteria for your archive rule, select Create and archive active findings to archive new and existing findings based on the rule criteria. Alternatively, you can choose Create rule to create the rule for new findings only. In the preceding example, I chose Create and archive active findings to archive all findings—existing and new—that match the criteria.

Update an archive rule to mark existing findings as intended

You can also update an archive rule to archive existing findings retroactively and streamline your findings. To edit an archive rule, choose Archive rules under Access Analyzer, then select an existing rule and choose Edit. In the Edit archive rule page, update the archive rule criteria and review the list of existing active findings the archive rule applies to. When you save the archive rule, you can apply it retroactively to existing findings by choosing Save and archive active findings as shown in Figure 3. Otherwise, you can choose Save rule to update the rule and apply it to new findings only.

Note: You can also use the new IAM Access Analyzer API operation ApplyArchiveRule to retroactively apply an archive rule to existing findings that meet the archive rule criteria.

 

Figure 3: IAM Access Analyzer edit archive rule page where you can apply the rule retroactively to existing findings by choosing Save and archive active findings

Figure 3: IAM Access Analyzer edit archive rule page where you can apply the rule retroactively to existing findings by choosing Save and archive active findings

Get started

To turn on IAM Access Analyzer at no additional cost, open the IAM console. IAM Access Analyzer is available at no additional cost in the IAM console and through APIs in all commercial AWS Regions, AWS China Regions, and AWS GovCloud (US). To learn more about IAM Access Analyzer and which resources it supports, visit the feature page.

If you have feedback about this post, submit comments in the Comments section below. If you have questions about this post, start a new thread on the AWS IAM forum or contact AWS Support.

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Author

Andrea Nedic

Andrea is a Sr. Tech Product Manager for AWS Identity and Access Management. She enjoys hearing from customers about how they build on AWS. Outside of work, Andrea likes to ski, dance, and be outdoors. She holds a PhD from Princeton University.