The countries making it easier for you to visit

Don’t look so glum – getting to Madagascar has never been easier – getty

Stuffy bureaucrats and lengthy waits at visa offices are becoming a thing of the past – thankfully

It can be easy, in this time of political turbulence, to see walls rising wherever you look – from the physical barrier that the US president wants to build on the Mexican border to the metaphorical type that may yet appear between this country and continental Europe, particularly if the Brexit stalemate resolves itself as a no-deal departure come October 31.

But whatever your stance on Britain’s future relationship with Brussels, red tape and paperwork are rarely friends of the traveller – and those who perceive the planet to be narrowing may fear a coming era of trickier journeys and delays at airport passport desks.

This means straightforward access to places on the fabled Silk Road, such as the grand city of Samarkand, with its shrines and madrasas (colleges). 

Silk Road cities, like Khiva, are now easier to discover Credit: GETTY

Kazakhstan, land of futuristic skyscrapers and Borat, signed a visa-free arrangement with the UK in 2014 (for stays up to 30 days) and now three of the five Central Asian “stans” can be visited without a visa (the third being Kyrgyzstan). It has been suggested that Tajikistan could follow suit in the coming years (it currently uses an e-visa system).” data-reactid=”34″>Kazakhstan, land of futuristic skyscrapers and Borat, signed a visa-free arrangement with the UK in 2014 (for stays up to 30 days) and now three of the five Central Asian “stans” can be visited without a visa (the third being Kyrgyzstan). It has been suggested that Tajikistan could follow suit in the coming years (it currently uses an e-visa system).

https://evisa.xuatnhapcanh.gov.vn) for a 30-day e-visa (for US$25/£20). ” data-reactid=”35″>Of course, if a landlocked Central Asian republic is not to your taste, there is always notably sea-facing Vietnam, which introduced a visa-waiver policy for 24 nations in 2015. Initially, this was to be a year-long experiment, but the trial has been such a success that, last summer, it was extended until June 2021 (and is likely to become permanent). At present, it lets British passport holders stay for up to 15 days; long enough to see the core attractions. If you are planning a more detailed odyssey, you can apply online (at https://evisa.xuatnhapcanh.gov.vn) for a 30-day e-visa (for US$25/£20). 

A fruit seller in Hoi An, Vietnam Credit: GETTY

Sri Lanka is back on the travel map Credit: GETTY