Is Linux Taking Over The World?

“2019 just might be the Year of Linux — the year in which Linux is fully recognized as the powerhouse it has become,” writes Network World’s “Unix dweeb.” The fact is that most people today are using Linux without ever knowing it — whether on their phones, online when using Google, Facebook, Twitter, GPS devices, and maybe even in their cars, or when using cloud storage for personal or business use. While the presence of Linux on all of these systems may go largely unnoticed by consumers, the role that Linux plays in this market is a sign of how critical it has become. Most IoT and embedded devices — those small, limited functionality devices that require good security and a small footprint and fill so many niches in our technology-driven lives — run some variety of Linux, and this isn’t likely to change. Instead, we’ll just be seeing more devices and a continued reliance on open source to drive them.

According to the Cloud Industry Forum, for the first time, businesses are spending more on cloud than on internal infrastructure. The cloud is taking over the role that data centers used to play, and it’s largely Linux that’s making the transition so advantageous. Even on Microsoft’s Azure, the most popular operating system is Linux. In its first Voice of the Enterprise survey, 451 Research predicted that 60 percent of nearly 1,000 IT leaders surveyed plan to run the majority of their IT off premises by 2019. That equates to a lot of IT efforts relying on Linux. Gartner states that 80 percent of internally developed software is now either cloud-enabled or cloud-native.


The article also cites Linux’s use in AI, data lakes, and in the Sierra supercomputer that monitors America’s nuclear stockpile, concluding that “In its domination of IoT, cloud technology, supercomputing and AI, Linux is heading into 2019 with a lot of momentum.”

And there’s even a long list of upcoming Linux conferences…