AWS Security Profiles: Quint Van Deman, Principal Business Development Manager

Amazon Spheres and author info

In the weeks leading up to re:Invent, we’ll share conversations we’ve had with people at AWS who will be presenting at the event so you can learn more about them and some of the interesting work that they’re doing.


How long have you been at AWS, and what do you do in your current role?

I joined AWS in August 2014. I spent my first two and a half years in the Professional Services group, where I ran around the world to help some of our largest customers sort through their security and identity implementations. For the last two years, I’ve parleyed that experience into my current role of Business Development Manager for the Identity and Directory Services group. I help the product development team build services and features that address the needs I’ve seen in our customer base. We’re working on a next generation of features that we think will radically simplify the way customers implement and manage identities and permissions within the cloud environment. The other key element of my job is to find and disseminate the most innovative solutions I’m seeing today across the broadest possible set of AWS customers to help them be more successful faster.

How do you explain your job to non-tech friends?

I keep one foot in the AWS service team organizations, where they build features, and one foot in day-to-day customer engagement to understand the real-world experiences of people using AWS. I learn about the similarities and differences between how these two groups operate, and then I help service teams understand these similarities and differences, as well.

You’re a “bar raiser” for the Security Blog. What does that role entail?

The notion of being a bar raiser has a lot of different facets at Amazon. The general concept is that, as we go about certain activities — whether hiring new employees or preparing blog posts — we send things past an outside party with no team biases. As a bar raiser for the Security Blog, I don’t have a lot of incentive to get posts out because of a deadline. My role is to make sure that nothing is published until it successfully addresses a customer need. At Amazon, we put the best customer experience first. As a bar raiser, I work to hold that line, even though it might not be the fastest approach, or the path of least resistance.

What’s the most challenging part of your job?

Ruthless prioritization. One of our leadership principles at Amazon is frugality. Sometimes, that means staying in cheap hotel rooms, but more often it means frugality of resources. In my case, I’ve been given the awesome charter to serve as the Business Development Manager for our suite of Identity and Directory Services. I’m something of a one-man army the world over. But that means a lot of things come past my desk, and I have to prioritize ruthlessly to ensure I’m focusing on the things that will be most impactful for our customers.

What’s your favorite part of your job?

A lot of our customers are doing an awesome job being bar raisers themselves. They’re pushing the envelope in terms of identity-focused solutions in their own AWS environments. One fulfilling part of my work is getting to collaborate with those customers who are on the leading edge: Their AWS field teams will get ahold of me, and then I get to do two really fun things. First, I get to dive in and help these customers succeed at whatever they’re trying to do. Second, I get to learn from them. I get to examine the really amazing ideas they’ve come up with and see if we might be able to generalize their solutions and roll them out to the delight of many more AWS customers that might not have teams mature enough to build them on their own. While my title is Business Development Manager, I’m a technologist through and through. Getting to dive into these thorny technical situations and see them resolve into really great solutions is extremely rewarding.

How did you choose your particular topics for re:Invent 2018?

Over the last year, I’ve talked with lots of customers and AWS field teams. My Mastering Identity at Every Layer of the Cake session was born out of the fact that I noticed a lot of folks doing a lot of work to get identity for AWS right, but other layers of identity that are just as important weren’t getting as much attention. I made it my mission to provide a more holistic understanding of what identity in the cloud means to these customers, and over time I developed ways of articulating the topic which really seemed to resonate. My session is about sharing this understanding more broadly. It’s a 400-level talk, since I want to really dive deep with my audience. I have five embedded demos, all of which are going to show how to combine multiple features, sprinkle in a bit of code, and apply them to near universally applicable customer use cases.

Why use the metaphor of a layer cake?

I’ve found that analogies and metaphors are very effective ways of grounding someone’s mental imagery when you’re trying to relay a complex topic. Last year, my metaphor was bridges. This year, I decided to go with cake: It’s actually very descriptive of the way that our customers need to think about Identity in AWS since there are multiple layers. (Also, who doesn’t like cake? It’s delicious.)

What are you hoping that your audience will take away from the session?

Customers are spending a lot of time getting identity right at the AWS layer. And that’s a ground-level, must-do task. I’m going to put a few new patterns in the audience’s hands to do this more effectively. But as a whole, we aren’t consistently putting as much effort into the infrastructure and application layers. That’s what I’m really hoping to expose people to. We have a wealth of features that really raise the bar in terms of cloud security and identity — from how users authenticate to operating systems or databases, to how they authenticate to the applications and APIs that they put on AWS. I want to expose these capabilities to folks and paint a vivid image for them of the really powerful things that they can do today that they couldn’t have done before.

What do you want your audience to do differently after attending your session?

During the session, I’ll be taking a handful of features that are really interesting in their own right, and combining them in a way that I hope will absolutely delight my audience. For example, I’ll show how you can take AWS CloudFormation macros and AWS Identity and Access Management, layer a little bit of customization on top, and come up with something far more magical than either of the two individually. It’s an advanced use case that, with very little effort, can disproportionately improve your security posture while letting your organization move faster. That’s just one example though, and the session is going to be loaded with them, including a grand finale. I’ve already started the work to open source a lot of what I’m going to show, but even where I can’t open source, I want to paint a very clear, prescriptive blueprint for how to get there. My goal is that my audience goes back to work on Monday and, within a couple of hours, they’ve measurably moved the security bar for their organization.

Any tips for first-time conference attendees?

Be deliberate about going outside of your comfort zone. If you’re not working in Security, come to one of our sessions. If you do work in Security, go to some other tracks, like Dev-Ops or Analytics, to get that cross-pollination of ideas. One of the most amazing things about AWS is how it helps dramatically lower the barrier to entry for unfamiliar technology domains and tools. A developer can ship more secure code faster by being invested in security, and a security expert can disproportionally scale their impact by applying the tools of developers or data scientists. Re:Invent is an amazing place to start exploring that diversity, and if you do, I suspect you’ll find ways to immediately make yourself better at your day job.

Five years from now, what changes do you think we’ll see across the security and compliance landscape?

Complexity versus human understanding have always been at odds. I see initiatives across AWS that have all kinds of awesome innovation and computer science behind them. In the coming years, I think these will mature to the point that they will be able to offload much of the natural complexity that comes with securing large scale environments with extremely fine grain permissions. Folks will be able to provide very simple statements or rules of how they want their environment to be, and we should be able to manage the complexity for them, and present them with a nice, clean picture they can easily understand.

What does cloud security mean to you, personally?

I see possibilities today that were herculean tasks before. For example, the process to make sure APIs can properly authenticate and authorize each other used to be an extremely elaborate process at scale. It became such an impossible mess that only the largest of organizations with the best skills, the best technology, and the best automation were really able to achieve it. Everyone else just had to punt or put a band-aid on the problem. But in the world of the cloud, all it takes is attaching an AWS IAM role on one side, and a fairly small resource-based policy to an Amazon API Gateway API on the other. Examples like this show how we’re making security that would once have been extremely difficult for most customers to afford or implement simple to configure, get right, and deploy ubiquitously, and that’s really powerful. It’s what keeps me passionate about my work.

If you had to pick any other job, what would you want to do with your life?

I’ve got all kinds of whacky hobbies. I kiteboard, I surf, work on massive renovation projects at home, hike and camp in the backcountry, and fly small airplanes. It’s an overwhelming set of hobbies that didn’t align with my professional aptitude. But if the world were my oyster and I had to do something else, I would want to combine those hobbies into one single career that’s never before been seen.

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Author

Quint Van Deman

Quint is the global business development manager for AWS Identity and Directory services. In this role, he leads the incubation, scaling, and evolution of new and existing identity-based services, as well as field enablement and strategic customer advisement for the same. Before joining the BD team, Quint was an early member of the AWS Professional Services team, where he was a Senior Consultant leading cloud transformation teams at several prominent enterprise customers, and a company-wide subject matter expert on IAM and Identity federation.