Saks, Lord & Taylor Stores Hit by Data Breach

A data breach at Saks Fifth Avenue and Lord & Taylor stores in North America exposed customer payment card data, parent company Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC) announced on Sunday.

The hack, which also impacted its discount store brand Saks OFF 5TH, did not appear to affect HBC’s e-commerce or other digital platforms.

“We identified the issue, took steps to contain it, and believe it no longer poses a risk to customers shopping at our stores,” the announcement said. “We are working rapidly with leading data security investigators to get our customers the information they need, and our investigation is ongoing. We also are coordinating with law enforcement authorities and the payment card companies,” it added.

According to cybersecurity research and threat intelligence firm Gemini Advisory, a cybercrime marketplace called JokerStash announced that over five million stolen credit and debit cards were for sale, which it says were likely stolen from HBC’s stores. 

“In cooperation with several financial organizations, we have confirmed with a high degree of confidence that the compromised records were stolen from customers of Saks Fifth Avenue and Lord & Taylor stores,” Gemini said in a blog post, adding that the window of compromise was estimated to be May 2017 to present.”

As of Sunday, roughly 125,000 records had been released for sale so far, Gemini said, with the “entire cache” expected to become available in the following months.

HBC did not provide details on the number of customers/records impacted in the incident. 

“The Company is working rapidly with leading data security investigators to get customers the information they need, and the investigation is ongoing. HBC is also coordinating with law enforcement authorities and the payment card companies,” HBC said.

“The details of how these cards were stolen remains unclear at this time, but it’s important that we learn what happened so that others can work to prevent similar breaches,” commented Tim Erlin, VP, product management and strategy at Tripwire. “This appears to be the type of breach, through point-of-sale systems, that EMV is supposed to prevent, so we need to ask what happened here. Was EMV in use, and if so, how did the attackers circumvent it?

News of HBC’s breach comes days after sports gear maker Under Armour said that a data breach of its fitness application was hacked, affecting approximately 150 million user accounts.

view counter

For more than 10 years, Mike Lennon has been closely monitoring the threat landscape and analyzing trends in the National Security and enterprise cybersecurity space. In his role at SecurityWeek, he oversees the editorial direction of the publication and is the Director of several leading security industry conferences around the world.

Previous Columns by Mike Lennon:

Tags: