How Cambridge Analytica Used Big Sleaze To Mine Big Data (Forbes)

How Cambridge Analytica Used Big Sleaze To Mine Big Data Tech #CuttingEdge

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Ed Hall

Ed Hall/Cartoon of the Day

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Cambridge Analytica, the privately-held company that mines and analyzes data and then attempts to use those findings to influence electoral processes, fell squarely in the news this week when it was discovered that the firm had harvested private information from the Facebook profiles of more than 50 million users. The breach allowed the company to exploit the activities of a huge swath of the American electorate, developing techniques that now seem to have aided the 2016 Trump campaign.
But it gets worse. It was also discovered that the company may have  used bribes, lies, and the promise of sexual favors to entrap politicians. Anyone who has had contact with the company and its executives notes a culture of fraud, deception, and lies. It is interesting that their logo is a “connect-the-dots” schematic of a brain. Now it seems the media is connecting some dots of their own. On Tuesday, CEO Alexander Nix was suspended after taking credit for the Trump campaign on a live video feed. Vanity does have its limits. Cartoon by Ed Hall.

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Ed Hall

Ed Hall/Cartoon of the Day

Cambridge Analytica, the privately-held company that mines and analyzes data and then attempts to use those findings to influence electoral processes, fell squarely in the news this week when it was discovered that the firm had harvested private information from the Facebook profiles of more than 50 million users. The breach allowed the company to exploit the activities of a huge swath of the American electorate, developing techniques that now seem to have aided the 2016 Trump campaign.
But it gets worse. It was also discovered that the company may have  used bribes, lies, and the promise of sexual favors to entrap politicians. Anyone who has had contact with the company and its executives notes a culture of fraud, deception, and lies. It is interesting that their logo is a “connect-the-dots” schematic of a brain. Now it seems the media is connecting some dots of their own. On Tuesday, CEO Alexander Nix was suspended after taking credit for the Trump campaign on a live video feed. Vanity does have its limits. Cartoon by Ed Hall.